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Accessibility

The ‘Accessibility’ section contains pictograms that can be used on a website to indicate step-free access to a location or accessible services, or to guide users to a step-free access route.

When using an accessibility symbol, ensure that the service, space or building indicated with that symbol actually fulfils the criteria for accessibility. The ESKEH survey is a good tool for assessing accessibility in a built-up environment. ESKEH survey forms can be found on this website under Design Guidelines. There are site-specific accessibility guides and specimen reports, for instance for swimming baths, service centres for the elderly and daycare centres. There is additional information on accessibility in museums and other cultural services on the Culture for All Service website.

The International Symbol of Access, ISA
 
 

ISA symbol. The icon shows a person sitting in a wheelchair against a blue background.

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ISA stands for International Symbol of Access, the universal symbol for persons with reduced mobility.

The ISA symbol is used for instance to label a step-free entrance to a building, an accessible WC or parking spaces for the disabled. It may also be used to indicate a step-free access route or accessible service (e.g. the way to the lifts or an accessible dressing room at a sports facility).

The official ISA symbol may be used on a blue or black background. The symbol may be reversed.

A print-ready file of the ISA symbol can be found on the accessibility pages of the Finnish Association of People with Physical Disabilities. There is also further information there on the development and use of the symbol.

Accessible Escape Route
 
 

Accessible escape route

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An example of an accessible escape route sign.

Induction loop
 
 

Induction loop. The icon shows an ear in the middle and a small letter T at the bottom, against a white background.

Source: ETSI EN 301 462

The international symbol for an induction loop may be found in the ETSI standard ETSI EN 301 462, ‘Symbols to identify telecommunications facilities for deaf and hard of hearing people’

This symbol is used to identify premises where an induction loop has been installed. There should be an induction loop in all public premises where people talk and listen (function rooms, auditoriums, meeting rooms, service counters).

A print-ready version of the induction loop symbol is available from the Finnish Federation of Hard of Hearing.

 


Sign-language services
 
 

Sign-language services. The icon shows two hands forming a pattern, against a white background.
Source: Culture for All Service

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Sign-language services may include signed interpreting, audiovisual material with sign language or service personnel competent in sign language at a service point.


Services for the visually impaired, visual impairment symbol

 
Services for the visually impaired. The icon shows a person walking with a white cane, seen from the side, against a white background.
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Services for the visually impaired. The icon shows a person walking with a white cane, seen from the side, against a dark background.

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Services for the visually impaired include Braille, raised text and images, touchable objects in museums, etc., scale models and tactile maps. These services also include floor strips and tactile paving tiles, and descriptive narration.

 

Braille symbol
 
 

Braille. The icon shows six dots and the text ‘Braille’ underneath them, against a white background.

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Braille. The icon shows six dots and the text ‘Braille’ underneath them, against a dark background.

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Service dogs
 
 
Service dog. The icon shows a dog wearing a service dog’s harness, against a white background.
Source: Culture for All Service

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A service dog may be a guide dog, an assistance dog or a hearing dog. Service dogs are allowed to accompany their users in all service premises, but this symbol may be used to indicate that service dogs are particularly welcome. A resting place for dogs in a building may be designated by combining this with the P sign.


Electric mobility scooter
 
 

Electric mobility scooter. The icon shows an electric mobility scooter from the side, the seat on the left and the handlebar on the right, against a white background.

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Electric mobility scooter. The icon shows an electric mobility scooter from the side, the seat on the left and the handlebar on the right, against a dark background.

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The electric mobility scooter symbol can be used to designate a parking space. If there is an electrical outlet available for recharging the vehicle, this can be indicated by combining the symbol with the symbol for a recharging point

 

Rollator, walker
 
 

Rollator. The icon shows a rollator, i.e. a wheeled frame for walking, seen from the side, against a white background.

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Rollator. The icon shows a rollator, i.e. a wheeled frame for walking, seen from the side, against a dark background.

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Large print, books, magazines, etc.
 
 
Large print book. The icon shows three progressively larger versions of the letter A, the largest inside a magnifying glass, against a white background.

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Large print book. The icon shows three progressively larger versions of the letter A, the largest inside a magnifying glass, against a dark background.

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Large print materials must have a font size of preferably 14 pt but in any case no less than 12 pt. Font size 13–14 pt should be primarily used in materials intended for readers of all ages.  If the target audience consists mostly of people who are visually impaired, the recommended font size is 16 pt.

The line spacing should be 1–4 points larger than the font size. The contrast between background and text is even more of an issue for readability than font size. Black text on a white background provides the best contrast.

Source: Finnish Federation of the Visually Impaired

The typeface should be simple and legible. Typefaces such as Arial, Georgia, Gill, Helvetica and Verdana are good. Legibility includes having clear differences between letters and other symbols. Each character should be uniquely identifiable. It must be possible to recognise each character quickly and correctly.

Lower-case text is easier to read than upper-case text. Lower-case letters are more distinctive than upper-case letters and therefore easier to identify. Text written in all upper case, underlined or tilted is difficult to read.


Plain language logo
 
 
Plain language logo. The icon shows a black, S-shaped arrow, against a white background.

The plain language logo designates a plain-language book or magazine, signage or website.

In order to use the plain language logo, you must obtain permission from Selkokeskus (the plain language centre). The logo must be accompanied by a descriptive text: plain-language book; plain-language magazine; plain-language signage; plain-language website.

For more information on the plain language logo and how to obtain permission to use it, contact Selkokeskus: http://papunet.net/selkokeskus/in-english.html


Assistive device lending
 
 
Assistive device lending. The icon shows a wheelchair within an encircling arrow, against a white background.

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Assistive device lending. The icon shows a wheelchair within an encircling arrow, against a dark background.

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This symbol may be used for instance on the website of a facility offering the loan of assistive devices as part of accessibility services. The equipment available may be listed adjacent to the symbol: a shower wheelchair at a swimming path or visual aids at a museum. This symbol may also be used on site to mark the location where the assistive devices are kept and where they should be returned.

 

Audio guides
 
 

Audio guides. The icon shows a pair of earphones against a white background.

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Audio guides. The icon shows a pair of earphones against a dark background.

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The audio guide symbol may be used at cultural venues where information on the works displayed is available for listening through earphones.
 

Listen
 
 

Listen. The icon shows a speaker with three curved lines depicting sound waves against a white background.

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Listen. The icon shows a speaker with three curved lines depicting sound waves against a dark background.

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The Listen symbol can be used on a website to indicate that the text can be listened to, or for instance at railway or bus stations to indicate an audio timetable or transport information service.

 


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14.03.2018 17:31